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There are a range of massage therapy schools in the Twin Cities metropolitan area. Most offer a wide range of training and courses to meet all needs of the massage therapist. A number of these offer Reflexology as part of a typical training program. Just what is Reflexology? It is an alternative treatment approach that focuses on energy flow to help relieve the tension and stress found in the body.<br><br>It's not surprising that the popularity of Reflexology has spread quickly across the nation. The techniques for reflexology are very different from traditional massage, nevertheless include it as part of an optional course for any of the licensed massage and shiatsu diploma programs in Minneapolis massage therapy school. Since it is such a popular modality, many massage therapists have chosen to include Reflexology among their massage specialties. Because of this, massage therapists may benefit by adding Reflexology as another modality to their clinic. In addition, students pursuing a professional massage therapy degree or continuing their education can learn Reflexology in their school and then add it to their program.<br><br>The benefits of Reflexology come from the specific regions of the body where reflex points are situated. When applied properly, it will target these reflex areas in the hands and feet to help promote healing through increased blood flow and decreased tension. This same targeted program will also improve muscle strength in the shoulders and back. However, just as with massage, there are not specific regions of the body which are targeted for reflexology. Instead, it's believed that the feet and hands are the best location for applying pressure for maximum benefits.<br><br>Perhaps the most popular region in which Reflexology is practiced is over the shoulders and neck. Massage techniques focus mainly on those regions because they're thought to harbor a great deal of energy that can be tapped for therapeutic benefits. As a result of this, applying pressure points like those from the neck and shoulders is a fantastic way to both relax the body and create extra energy for healing. While massage therapy focuses primarily on stress points on the body, Reflexology applies its therapy methods to the specific areas where pressure points are located.<br><br>Another area where Reflexology could be applied is within the ears. This isn't surprising given the proximity to the head and neck. The ear is also connected to the brain which provides the ears their sensory organ, thus providing a potential source of sensory input. Because the ear contains sensitive nerve endings, the use of massage to the ears provides a calming effect as well as the potential advantages of stimulating the nervous system which assists in the healing process. This is why ear reflexology has been seen as an effective modality in the treatment of chronic conditions like depression, stress and pain.<br><br>One of the key ways in which Reflexology may be used is through the use of pressure points on the whole body. Pressure points refer to targeted areas in the body that allow for better blood circulation, thus allowing for increased general wellness. For example, there's a particular pressure point referred to as the acupoints located near the wrist. By applying pressure on these acupoints, the reflex points found in the wrist begin to transfer blood circulation to the whole body, including the skin. By increasing blood flow, the whole body can increase its immune system and work more effectively to fight disease and heal itself.<br><br>As mentioned before, Reflexology uses its finger pressure points to stimulate the nerves in the body. It is this connection to the nervous system that makes Reflexology therapeutic in many cases. However, as interesting as that may sound, the primary reason that massage therapy is frequently considered as capable of relieving pain and the treatment of a variety of conditions is because of its ability to alter the state of a person's energy system. According to conventional reflexology, the body consists of the five standard meridians that run parallel to one another. By working each meridian with different techniques, the energy system of the person is able to be changed.<br><br>Massage allows for the easy transfer of energy across the meridians and into the various parts of the body. If done properly, it can stimulate the proper circulation in the body, allowing for organs to obtain the proper nutrients they need. Besides potential benefits such as improved circulation, there are also proven reflexology methods that can help decrease pain and reduce the recovery time following an injury or operation. Therefore, whatever you initially had in mind once you chose to go to the spa, it might be worth it to consider Reflexology.<br><br>If you liked this posting and you would like to obtain additional facts with regards to [https://redeemedpeoplesacademy.com/members/hoegeese57/activity/32267/ 출장안마] kindly pay a visit to our webpage.
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'''Mission:''' The Council on Ionizing Radiation Measurements and Standards (CIRMS) is an independent, non-profit organization that draws together stakeholders from government, industry and academia to discuss, review and assess national needs in the field of ionizing radiation to enhance societal benefits.
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[[File:Wes Culberson 1.jpg|thumb|2020 CIRMS President Wes Culberson]]
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'''Vision:''' CIRMS seeks to inform the national debate on issues involving ionizing radiation to make policy recommendations based on the interplay among fundamental scientific advancement, practical implementation of ionizing radiation technologies and governmental rules and regulations to ensure public safety. To achieve these ends, CIRMS seeks to organize expert opinion in focus areas: 1) medical applications, 2) radiation safety and security, and 3) industrial applications and materials effects.
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'''Dynamic Needs Report:''' Through this online forum, CIRMS seeks to engage the community with the thoughtful insights and the results of vigorous discussions at our annual meetings and throughout the year. The goals of the Dynamic Needs Report is to track and keep up-to-date needs in the community that represent 1.) areas in which federal regulations are insufficient to deal with rapidly evolving technologies, 2.) areas which member companies have identified as fertile areas for academia research which could lead to compelling graduate theses 3.) areas in which national, state or local funding priorities seems to be misprioritized to address the mission of CIRMS and 4.) areas in logistics and critical infrastructure which limit CIRMS and its affiliate labs, companies and academics from having access to traceable measurement standards in fields related to ionizing radiation.
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'''2022 Policy Recommendations:''' Attend [https://cirms.org/annual-meeting/ CIRMS 2022 on April 11, 2022] to learn, participate, suggest and propose.  
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'''2016 Policy Recommendations:''' CIRMS highlights current deficiencies and suggests informed dialog to address these 2016 Needs in Ionizing Radiation Measurements and Standards:
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1. Secure the nation's electronic infrastructure: There exists a critical need for a traceable measurement standard for low alpha particle emissions to improve reliability of semiconductors and computer systems to support defense, aerospace, global banking, advanced manufacturing and the Internet of Things.
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2. Ensure the safety of patients, food and manufactured products: Now that Co-60 source suppliers no longer provide reloading of Gamma Cell irradiators to support traceability to the US national standard for for industrial and manufacturing applications, and medical device sterilization, there exists a critical need to assure the availability of national measurement standards for high dose rate gamma irradiation.
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3. Maintain US leadership in our future technological workforce: There exists a need for targeted funding for students to engage with scientific leaders in academia, federal labs, agencies and leading industry to sustain global leadership through an educated workforce which ensures stability of expertise in ionizing radiation measurements and standards.
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'''2011 Policy Recommendations:''' CIRMS highlights current deficiencies and suggests informed dialog to address these 2011 Needs in Ionizing Radiation Measurements and Standards:
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1. US Congress must find ways to better inform the public perception of radiation or risk reducing scientific advantage, economic advantage and domestic job creation.
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2. The Federal Government and associated Regulatory Agencies should immediately prioritize developing 21st century rules and regulations, informed by the scientific community, to enable progress toward elimination of food-borne pathogens/pests, increase shelf life and inhibit sprouting and maturation, while increasing food safety.
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3. A virtual national laboratory consortium is needed that can support regulatory, research and development uses and measurement of ionizing radiation to leverage national brick and mortar assets at universities, DoE laboratories, and government laboratories.
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4. An independent review panel should be established to evaluate all requests for isotopes that are not now currently available from commercial sources, based on recommendations from CIRMS, the National Academies Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board (NAS NRSB) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC).
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5. National dialog among NIH, NIST, university, and DoE laboratories is needed to better control the supply of the molybdenum-99 isotope.
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6. A coherent long-term funding mechanism must be found to support maintenance of the mathematical modeling codes implementing the effects of ionizing radiation on materials.
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'''Metrology Needs:''' Each year, each of the subcommittees of the CIRMS Science and Technology Committee prepares a series of Measurement Program Descriptions (MPDs). These emerge through data sharing and focused discussion at CIRMS meetings and workshops. The MPDs offer guidelines for scientific funding agencies, corporations or academic investigators with ties to ionizing radiation about issues which the community feels are relevant today. These represent potential target areas for funding research, where federal regulation may soon change, and where new ideas and rules may propel emerging technologies into new markets. These needs are grouped into the 2011 CIRMS focus areas: 1) medical applications, 2) personnel and environmental radiation protection, 3) homeland security technologies, and 4) industrial applications and materials effects.

Latest revision as of 16:15, 19 September 2022

Mission: The Council on Ionizing Radiation Measurements and Standards (CIRMS) is an independent, non-profit organization that draws together stakeholders from government, industry and academia to discuss, review and assess national needs in the field of ionizing radiation to enhance societal benefits.


2020 CIRMS President Wes Culberson

Vision: CIRMS seeks to inform the national debate on issues involving ionizing radiation to make policy recommendations based on the interplay among fundamental scientific advancement, practical implementation of ionizing radiation technologies and governmental rules and regulations to ensure public safety. To achieve these ends, CIRMS seeks to organize expert opinion in focus areas: 1) medical applications, 2) radiation safety and security, and 3) industrial applications and materials effects.


Dynamic Needs Report: Through this online forum, CIRMS seeks to engage the community with the thoughtful insights and the results of vigorous discussions at our annual meetings and throughout the year. The goals of the Dynamic Needs Report is to track and keep up-to-date needs in the community that represent 1.) areas in which federal regulations are insufficient to deal with rapidly evolving technologies, 2.) areas which member companies have identified as fertile areas for academia research which could lead to compelling graduate theses 3.) areas in which national, state or local funding priorities seems to be misprioritized to address the mission of CIRMS and 4.) areas in logistics and critical infrastructure which limit CIRMS and its affiliate labs, companies and academics from having access to traceable measurement standards in fields related to ionizing radiation.


2022 Policy Recommendations: Attend CIRMS 2022 on April 11, 2022 to learn, participate, suggest and propose.


2016 Policy Recommendations: CIRMS highlights current deficiencies and suggests informed dialog to address these 2016 Needs in Ionizing Radiation Measurements and Standards:

1. Secure the nation's electronic infrastructure: There exists a critical need for a traceable measurement standard for low alpha particle emissions to improve reliability of semiconductors and computer systems to support defense, aerospace, global banking, advanced manufacturing and the Internet of Things.

2. Ensure the safety of patients, food and manufactured products: Now that Co-60 source suppliers no longer provide reloading of Gamma Cell irradiators to support traceability to the US national standard for for industrial and manufacturing applications, and medical device sterilization, there exists a critical need to assure the availability of national measurement standards for high dose rate gamma irradiation.

3. Maintain US leadership in our future technological workforce: There exists a need for targeted funding for students to engage with scientific leaders in academia, federal labs, agencies and leading industry to sustain global leadership through an educated workforce which ensures stability of expertise in ionizing radiation measurements and standards.

2011 Policy Recommendations: CIRMS highlights current deficiencies and suggests informed dialog to address these 2011 Needs in Ionizing Radiation Measurements and Standards:

1. US Congress must find ways to better inform the public perception of radiation or risk reducing scientific advantage, economic advantage and domestic job creation.

2. The Federal Government and associated Regulatory Agencies should immediately prioritize developing 21st century rules and regulations, informed by the scientific community, to enable progress toward elimination of food-borne pathogens/pests, increase shelf life and inhibit sprouting and maturation, while increasing food safety.

3. A virtual national laboratory consortium is needed that can support regulatory, research and development uses and measurement of ionizing radiation to leverage national brick and mortar assets at universities, DoE laboratories, and government laboratories.

4. An independent review panel should be established to evaluate all requests for isotopes that are not now currently available from commercial sources, based on recommendations from CIRMS, the National Academies Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board (NAS NRSB) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC).

5. National dialog among NIH, NIST, university, and DoE laboratories is needed to better control the supply of the molybdenum-99 isotope.

6. A coherent long-term funding mechanism must be found to support maintenance of the mathematical modeling codes implementing the effects of ionizing radiation on materials.


Metrology Needs: Each year, each of the subcommittees of the CIRMS Science and Technology Committee prepares a series of Measurement Program Descriptions (MPDs). These emerge through data sharing and focused discussion at CIRMS meetings and workshops. The MPDs offer guidelines for scientific funding agencies, corporations or academic investigators with ties to ionizing radiation about issues which the community feels are relevant today. These represent potential target areas for funding research, where federal regulation may soon change, and where new ideas and rules may propel emerging technologies into new markets. These needs are grouped into the 2011 CIRMS focus areas: 1) medical applications, 2) personnel and environmental radiation protection, 3) homeland security technologies, and 4) industrial applications and materials effects.