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The impact of office noise on functionality has lately been the topic of much debate. Several studies have attempted to measure the results of sound on office performance, but no consensus has been reached. Studies have tried to check the impact of surrounding noise on degrees of fatigue and alertness, however, the results are combined. A range of researchers report that the outcomes are consistent with a large number of classes, but conclusions are often controversial. A unique laboratory evaluation (EQ-i) was designed for the experimental assessment of office noise. The evaluation has been demonstrated to be a reliable tool for measuring the impact of noise on office productivity.<br><br>The EQ-i relies on two elements. 1 part measures the cognitive processing of workplace workers, while another component measures the subjective reaction of office workers to various visual stimuli. The testing process is performed in a quiet room with the sound of a personal computer turned off. A battery of tests is done on a particular group of office employees. A subjective questionnaire can be carried out on every person to receive information in their working habits and feelings concerning the workplace environment. Following a series of tests are conducted on a random sample of workplace employees, an average total score is calculated for every person.<br><br>Several other explanations have been advanced to account for the results of the EQ-i results. Potential explanations are that office workers weren't subjected to enough high intensity or low intensity noise throughout the testing interval, workplace equipment was malfunctioning or inaccurate, or the results were skewed due to several confounding factors. No alternate explanation has not yet been offered that can explain the results obtained from this test.<br><br>A test research was conducted to ascertain the relationship between ambient temperature and indoor lighting at a health setting. Researchers measured indoor lighting in four different points in the office area and found a strong and significant relationship between both. The investigators attributed this connection to the impact of light on worker's moods. Indoor temperature was shown to be negatively associated with the disposition of office employees as evidenced by a statistically significant increase in stress levels. The authors concluded that"the present review... indicates that there is a negative relationship between ambient temperature and mood among office employees."<br><br>In a different study, researchers tested the impact of red vs. blue light on neurobehavioral testing. They measured neurobehavioral testing at a dimly-lit room and found no difference in functionality between conditions. However, the researchers emphasized the importance of using an proper neurobehavioral testing protocol and executing standardized psychological evaluations in clinical settings. They also emphasized that more studies should be done in order to examine the effect of low illumination on neurobehavioral testing.<br><br>A third research project attempted to measure the impact of temperature on reaction time in a lab setting. Researchers measured reaction time at a dimly-lit space and found that the response time increased if there was an increase in room temperature. However, they stressed that this wasn't a substantial impact and was affected by the existence of other factors. For instance, a small increase in temperature diminished the amount of beta activity. Furthermore, the researchers emphasized that the effect of temperature on the response time could have significant implications for executive function evaluation.<br><br>The fourth research project tested the impact of temperature on executive function in an environment with two different light-sensitivity levels (daytime or dark). Two office workers, one having a day/night preference and another with a no-light preference, participated in a task in which their performance was analyzed with a reaction time paradigm. After finishing the job, the operation of the two office employees was compared. The results showed a significant main effect of temperature on the reaction time (p = 0.049). The authors concluded,"A distinct window of temperature benefit may donate to executive processing speed." This study demonstrated that temperature did indeed have a favorable effect on reaction time when it had been controlled for neighboring lightness or darkness.<br><br>Overall, these studies confirm the significance of temperature for work performance. Specifically, they show that fever can modulate numerous areas of performance like mood, attention, alertness, and mental functioning. Office employees are particularly susceptible to temperature changes, which is likely because of the inherently challenging nature of the work that involves sitting before a computer screen or working with extreme lighting conditions.<br><br>In case you adored this post along with you would like to be given more information concerning [https://gemsfly.in/members/nerveoboe34/activity/789811/ 서울오피스걸] kindly visit the website.
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'''Mission:''' The Council on Ionizing Radiation Measurements and Standards (CIRMS) is an independent, non-profit organization that draws together stakeholders from government, industry and academia to discuss, review and assess national needs in the field of ionizing radiation to enhance societal benefits.
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[[File:Wes Culberson 1.jpg|thumb|2020 CIRMS President Wes Culberson]]
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'''Vision:''' CIRMS seeks to inform the national debate on issues involving ionizing radiation to make policy recommendations based on the interplay among fundamental scientific advancement, practical implementation of ionizing radiation technologies and governmental rules and regulations to ensure public safety. To achieve these ends, CIRMS seeks to organize expert opinion in focus areas: 1) medical applications, 2) radiation safety and security, and 3) industrial applications and materials effects.
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'''Dynamic Needs Report:''' Through this online forum, CIRMS seeks to engage the community with the thoughtful insights and the results of vigorous discussions at our annual meetings and throughout the year. The goals of the Dynamic Needs Report is to track and keep up-to-date needs in the community that represent 1.) areas in which federal regulations are insufficient to deal with rapidly evolving technologies, 2.) areas which member companies have identified as fertile areas for academia research which could lead to compelling graduate theses 3.) areas in which national, state or local funding priorities seems to be misprioritized to address the mission of CIRMS and 4.) areas in logistics and critical infrastructure which limit CIRMS and its affiliate labs, companies and academics from having access to traceable measurement standards in fields related to ionizing radiation.
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'''2022 Policy Recommendations:''' Attend [https://cirms.org/annual-meeting/ CIRMS 2022 on April 11, 2022] to learn, participate, suggest and propose.  
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'''2016 Policy Recommendations:''' CIRMS highlights current deficiencies and suggests informed dialog to address these 2016 Needs in Ionizing Radiation Measurements and Standards:
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1. Secure the nation's electronic infrastructure: There exists a critical need for a traceable measurement standard for low alpha particle emissions to improve reliability of semiconductors and computer systems to support defense, aerospace, global banking, advanced manufacturing and the Internet of Things.
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2. Ensure the safety of patients, food and manufactured products: Now that Co-60 source suppliers no longer provide reloading of Gamma Cell irradiators to support traceability to the US national standard for for industrial and manufacturing applications, and medical device sterilization, there exists a critical need to assure the availability of national measurement standards for high dose rate gamma irradiation.
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3. Maintain US leadership in our future technological workforce: There exists a need for targeted funding for students to engage with scientific leaders in academia, federal labs, agencies and leading industry to sustain global leadership through an educated workforce which ensures stability of expertise in ionizing radiation measurements and standards.
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'''2011 Policy Recommendations:''' CIRMS highlights current deficiencies and suggests informed dialog to address these 2011 Needs in Ionizing Radiation Measurements and Standards:
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1. US Congress must find ways to better inform the public perception of radiation or risk reducing scientific advantage, economic advantage and domestic job creation.
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2. The Federal Government and associated Regulatory Agencies should immediately prioritize developing 21st century rules and regulations, informed by the scientific community, to enable progress toward elimination of food-borne pathogens/pests, increase shelf life and inhibit sprouting and maturation, while increasing food safety.
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3. A virtual national laboratory consortium is needed that can support regulatory, research and development uses and measurement of ionizing radiation to leverage national brick and mortar assets at universities, DoE laboratories, and government laboratories.
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4. An independent review panel should be established to evaluate all requests for isotopes that are not now currently available from commercial sources, based on recommendations from CIRMS, the National Academies Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board (NAS NRSB) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC).
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5. National dialog among NIH, NIST, university, and DoE laboratories is needed to better control the supply of the molybdenum-99 isotope.
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6. A coherent long-term funding mechanism must be found to support maintenance of the mathematical modeling codes implementing the effects of ionizing radiation on materials.
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'''Metrology Needs:''' Each year, each of the subcommittees of the CIRMS Science and Technology Committee prepares a series of Measurement Program Descriptions (MPDs). These emerge through data sharing and focused discussion at CIRMS meetings and workshops. The MPDs offer guidelines for scientific funding agencies, corporations or academic investigators with ties to ionizing radiation about issues which the community feels are relevant today. These represent potential target areas for funding research, where federal regulation may soon change, and where new ideas and rules may propel emerging technologies into new markets. These needs are grouped into the 2011 CIRMS focus areas: 1) medical applications, 2) personnel and environmental radiation protection, 3) homeland security technologies, and 4) industrial applications and materials effects.

Latest revision as of 16:15, 19 September 2022

Mission: The Council on Ionizing Radiation Measurements and Standards (CIRMS) is an independent, non-profit organization that draws together stakeholders from government, industry and academia to discuss, review and assess national needs in the field of ionizing radiation to enhance societal benefits.


2020 CIRMS President Wes Culberson

Vision: CIRMS seeks to inform the national debate on issues involving ionizing radiation to make policy recommendations based on the interplay among fundamental scientific advancement, practical implementation of ionizing radiation technologies and governmental rules and regulations to ensure public safety. To achieve these ends, CIRMS seeks to organize expert opinion in focus areas: 1) medical applications, 2) radiation safety and security, and 3) industrial applications and materials effects.


Dynamic Needs Report: Through this online forum, CIRMS seeks to engage the community with the thoughtful insights and the results of vigorous discussions at our annual meetings and throughout the year. The goals of the Dynamic Needs Report is to track and keep up-to-date needs in the community that represent 1.) areas in which federal regulations are insufficient to deal with rapidly evolving technologies, 2.) areas which member companies have identified as fertile areas for academia research which could lead to compelling graduate theses 3.) areas in which national, state or local funding priorities seems to be misprioritized to address the mission of CIRMS and 4.) areas in logistics and critical infrastructure which limit CIRMS and its affiliate labs, companies and academics from having access to traceable measurement standards in fields related to ionizing radiation.


2022 Policy Recommendations: Attend CIRMS 2022 on April 11, 2022 to learn, participate, suggest and propose.


2016 Policy Recommendations: CIRMS highlights current deficiencies and suggests informed dialog to address these 2016 Needs in Ionizing Radiation Measurements and Standards:

1. Secure the nation's electronic infrastructure: There exists a critical need for a traceable measurement standard for low alpha particle emissions to improve reliability of semiconductors and computer systems to support defense, aerospace, global banking, advanced manufacturing and the Internet of Things.

2. Ensure the safety of patients, food and manufactured products: Now that Co-60 source suppliers no longer provide reloading of Gamma Cell irradiators to support traceability to the US national standard for for industrial and manufacturing applications, and medical device sterilization, there exists a critical need to assure the availability of national measurement standards for high dose rate gamma irradiation.

3. Maintain US leadership in our future technological workforce: There exists a need for targeted funding for students to engage with scientific leaders in academia, federal labs, agencies and leading industry to sustain global leadership through an educated workforce which ensures stability of expertise in ionizing radiation measurements and standards.

2011 Policy Recommendations: CIRMS highlights current deficiencies and suggests informed dialog to address these 2011 Needs in Ionizing Radiation Measurements and Standards:

1. US Congress must find ways to better inform the public perception of radiation or risk reducing scientific advantage, economic advantage and domestic job creation.

2. The Federal Government and associated Regulatory Agencies should immediately prioritize developing 21st century rules and regulations, informed by the scientific community, to enable progress toward elimination of food-borne pathogens/pests, increase shelf life and inhibit sprouting and maturation, while increasing food safety.

3. A virtual national laboratory consortium is needed that can support regulatory, research and development uses and measurement of ionizing radiation to leverage national brick and mortar assets at universities, DoE laboratories, and government laboratories.

4. An independent review panel should be established to evaluate all requests for isotopes that are not now currently available from commercial sources, based on recommendations from CIRMS, the National Academies Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board (NAS NRSB) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC).

5. National dialog among NIH, NIST, university, and DoE laboratories is needed to better control the supply of the molybdenum-99 isotope.

6. A coherent long-term funding mechanism must be found to support maintenance of the mathematical modeling codes implementing the effects of ionizing radiation on materials.


Metrology Needs: Each year, each of the subcommittees of the CIRMS Science and Technology Committee prepares a series of Measurement Program Descriptions (MPDs). These emerge through data sharing and focused discussion at CIRMS meetings and workshops. The MPDs offer guidelines for scientific funding agencies, corporations or academic investigators with ties to ionizing radiation about issues which the community feels are relevant today. These represent potential target areas for funding research, where federal regulation may soon change, and where new ideas and rules may propel emerging technologies into new markets. These needs are grouped into the 2011 CIRMS focus areas: 1) medical applications, 2) personnel and environmental radiation protection, 3) homeland security technologies, and 4) industrial applications and materials effects.